Amazing Il Poggione Reviews from Vinous Media

Antonio Galloni at Vinous Media released his review of the new vintages of Il Poggione today and confirmed what we already knew to be true: Il Poggione makes high quality, age-worthy red wines that stand out from the category!

You can read Galloni’s review below:

Il Poggione remains a reference point for Montalcino. No large estate does a better job of achieving high quality at these production numbers, which typically top 220,000 bottles of Brunello alone. Fabrizio Bindocci and his son Alessandro, along with their team, have done a fabulous job with the new and upcoming releases. Since 1995 the Poggione Brunellos have been made with submerged-cap fermentations, an approach that is typical in Piedmont, but less so in Montalcino. The Brunellos are aged 33Hl French oak casks, three years for the straight Brunello and four years for the Riserva. In addition to these wines, I also tasted all of the estate's Brunellos from cask, as I have done here for many years. There will be no Riserva in either 2014 and 2013, while the lots are still separate for the 2012 and 2011. 

In my opinion, Il Poggione's straight Brunello di Montalcino is the single greatest, cellar worthy, Old World red for the money.

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Il Poggione 2010 Brunello di Montalcino – 94+ points
Sant’angelo in Colle, Tuscany
Drinking Window: 2018-2030

  • Il Poggione's 2010 Brunello di Montalcino is a remarkably beautiful wine. Rose petal, mint, cinnamon, sweet dark cherries and smoke lift from the glass in a translucent, wiry Brunello built on energy and power. This is an especially lifted, precise and nuanced Brunello from Il Poggione, with more emphasis on length and mid-weight structure rather than overt volume. In many ways, the 2010 comes across as a modern-day version of the 1982 Riserva. Readers who have tasted that wine know just how special that is. For the money, there is not a single better wine being made in Montalcino than Il Poggione's Brunello. Truth is, it is also better than many far more expensive offerings. There are two Brunellos I would buy confidently in any vintage. This is one of them. 
  • Antonio Galloni. Tasting date: February 2015 

Il Poggione 2010 Brunello di Montalcino Riserva Paganelli – (94-96) points
Sant’angelo in Colle, Tuscany
Drinking Window: 2020-2035

  • A dark, intensely brooding wine, the 2010 Brunello di Montalcino Riserva Paganelli bursts from the glass with an exotic tapestry of lavender, menthol, smoke, plums, tar, smoke and licorice, all framed by huge, massive tannins. There is plenty of fruit though, which suggests, the 2010 is going to age effortlessly for several decades. The Riserva won't be released until next year, but it should not be opened until it is at least 10-12 years old, and even then it is likely to be a strapping youngster. 
  • Antonio Galloni. Tasting date: February 2015 

Il Poggione 2013 Rosso di Montalcino – 91 points
Sant’angelo in Colle, Tuscany
Drinking Window: 2015-2023

  • Bright red cherries, stone fruits, smoke and tobacco are some of the notes that jump from the glass in the 2013 Rosso di Montalcino. In this vintage, the Rosso is bright, floral and medium in body, all of which make it extremely versatile. This is another fabulous Rosso from Il Poggione and also a terrific introduction to the year in Montalcino. 
  • Antonio Galloni. Tasting date: February 2015 

Il Poggione 2013 Rosso di Montalcino Leopoldo Franceschi – (89-91) points
Sant’angelo in Colle, Tuscany
Drinking Window: 2015-2025

  • The 2013 Rosso di Montalcino Leopoldo Franceschi is a bit richer and deeper than the straight Rosso, but the brightness of the vintage comes through just the same. Dark cherry, plum, spice, menthol and licorice add nuance on the textured, inviting finish. The Leopoldo Franceschi is a barrel selection made in the cellar and usually shows more oak influence than the straight Rosso. The 2013 is a big step up from the 2012 and absolutely delicious in its own right. 
  • Antonio Galloni. Tasting date: February 2015
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